501 TESUJI PROBLEMS PDF

K Attacking and Defending Moyos To order by Rob van Zeijst and Richard Bozulich Knowing the basic principles of go is the key to being able to find the best move in the opening and the middle game. The way to internalize these principles is by seeing how they are applied by pros in their games and by contemplating a large number of problems in which these principles are used. The second chapter presents detailed analyses of games played by top pros, showing how they build and defend moyos and how they attack them. Included are two masterpieces by Kitani Minoru, as well as games by Cho Chikun the master of invading moyos , Hane Naoki, and Sonoda Yuichi famous for his hyper-cosmic go. The final chapter presents whole-board problems in which the ideas presented in the first two chapters can be applied.

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K Attacking and Defending Moyos To order by Rob van Zeijst and Richard Bozulich Knowing the basic principles of go is the key to being able to find the best move in the opening and the middle game. The way to internalize these principles is by seeing how they are applied by pros in their games and by contemplating a large number of problems in which these principles are used. The second chapter presents detailed analyses of games played by top pros, showing how they build and defend moyos and how they attack them.

Included are two masterpieces by Kitani Minoru, as well as games by Cho Chikun the master of invading moyos , Hane Naoki, and Sonoda Yuichi famous for his hyper-cosmic go. The final chapter presents whole-board problems in which the ideas presented in the first two chapters can be applied.

Attacking and Defending Moyos is an essential book even for those who like to play a tight territorial game, for they will undoubtedly often meet opponents who build moyos.

It is also an essential book for those who like to build moyos but may be unsure of how to defend them against an attack. K Fight Like a Pro -- The Secrets of Kiai To order by Rob van Zeijst and Richard Bozulich Kiai is a concept that has received scant systematic attention in the go literature, even though it is often referred to in game commentaries.

Most westerners are familiar with kiai mainly in relation to the martial arts where it is translated as fighting spirit, a phrase that conjures up a feeling of aggression. In go, however, kiai means coming up with innovative and creative moves. Such moves not only have a global perspective, they also take into account local situations and they need to be backed up by deep and accurate reading.

Ideally, they perfectly meld the tactical and the strategic elements of a position; they are moves that cause other pros sit up and take notice. Professional games are full of kiai.

A top pro tries to avoid the ordinary move. He will not be submissive in his responses; rather, he will meet attack with counterattack.

Just because a move is a joseki move, a pro will still ponder it and try to find another move that is more appropriate to the overall position. This is how new josekis are born. For the most part, there are less than ten moves for each figure, making the games easy to follow.

However, this book is more than just a game book; it is also a problem book. Throughout each game at crucial points, questions are posed asking the reader what he thinks the next move should be. With this format, the reader becomes fully engaged in the game and the commentary. This is a book that will change the way you play and think about go. An exhaustive brute-force search for finding the best move is clearly impractical.

Clearly, a go player needs some principles to guide him. The expert go player definitely needs some principles to guide him in finding the best move. Even in positions where brute-force analysis is required in determining whether a group lives or dies or trying to increase your liberties in a capturing race, certain principles can provide valuable hints for finding the key moves. The purpose of this book is to bring together all the strategic and tactical principles of go.

The principles presented here can certainly be found scattered in the thousands of go books that have been published, but nowhere are they found collected in one place. All the go proverbs that have some concrete relevance to strategy or to tactics are included.

With all these principles contained under one cover, a go player can embark on a systematic study of them. Once all principles have been firmly implanted in your mind, you will instinctively and intuitively recall the relevant principle when they arise in your games through pattern recognition. If you are a kyu-level player, knowledge of these principles will improve your game by at least two stones.

Five Opening Principles Principle 1. First occupy the empty corners; second, enclose a corner or make an approach move; third, extend along the sides. Principle 2. Establish outposts throughout the board. Principle 3. Play where the fewest stones have been played.

Principle 4. Principle 5. Chapter Two. Extensions Principle 6A. From a single stone, extend two spaces. Principle 6B. Extend three spaces from a two-stone wall. Principle 6C. Extend four spaces from a three-stone wall. Principle 7. When opposing enclosures face each other, play on the central point between them. Principle 8. Extend up to five spaces from a corner enclosure.

Principle 9. Extend at least five spaces from a large-scale wall. Principle When reinforcing widely spaced extensions, maintain a balance between the third and fourth lines. The butterfly extension is bad shape. Chapter Three.

Moyos: Territorial Frameworks Principle When mapping out a moyo, play on the fourth line. Principle 13A. Play at the junction of two opposing moyos.

Principle 13B. Principle 16A. Principle 16B. Erase a double-wing formation with a capping move. Build a moyo with a shoulder hit. Reduce a large-scale moyo by playing into it no farther than its outer rim. Be willing to transfer a moyo from one part of the board to another. Chapter Four. Thickness Principle 24A. Principle 24B. Use your thickness to attack. Principle 24C. Ponnuki is worth 30 points. The tortoise shell is worth 60 points. Chapter Five. Defending and Attacking Weak Groups Principle Play urgent moves before big opening moves.

Principle 27A. Defending a weak group takes priority over big opening moves. Principle 27B. Principle 28A. Principle 28B. Principle 28C. Chapter Six. Good and Bad Shape Principle The plum-bowl shape is as solid as a rock. Chapter Seven. Creating and Exploiting a Shortage of Liberties Principle Play a hane at the head of two stones. Play a hane at the head of three stones.

Play at the center of three stones. Chapter Eight. Pressing, Pushing, and Crawling Principle Avoid crawling along the third line. Chapter Nine. Attacking Principle Attack from your weak stones. When stones are split into two weak groups, one will die.

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501 Tesuji Problems

There are two approaches to presenting tesujis problems. One approach is to collect problems according to the objective that tesujis accomplish. The other is to collect problems according to the kind of tesuji used. In this book the emphasis is on the latter. There are about 45 different kinds of moves that make up tesujis. Each of them is described by a Japanese term.

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501 TESUJI PROBLEMS PDF

Dile Mastering the Basics The turn in the center is a big move. Going through the tesujis in this book will be like getting a tesuji experience in games. Five Opening Principles Principle 1. By contrast LiChangHo Jingjiang Weiqi Shoujin collects all problems for each tesuji into its own section of the books.

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Book Review: 501 Tesuji Problems

It tries to answer a question many amateurs may ask: The monkey jump is worth eight points. Ponnuki is worth 30 points. Mastering the Basics Tesuji Problems Vol 4 Just as in a game, one never knows what kind of tesuji will appear. Before fighting a ko, count the number of ko threats.

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Five Hundred and One Tesuji Problems

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